Abused Women's Understandings of Intimate Partner Violence and the Link to Intimate Femicide

Bianca Dekel, Michelle Andipatin

Abstract


In this article, we explore how women survivors of intimate partner violence understand the abuse they endured and the possible link to intimate femicide. This is a qualitative study based on a feminist poststructuralist perspective. Seven South African women, aged 23 to 50 years, with a history of different manifestations of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) participated in open-ended interviews. The data was analyzed by means of discourse analysis. In their explanations, the women constructed gendered identities, which reflected contradictory and ambiguous subjective experiences. The women's understandings were filtered through the particular social context in which their abusive experiences occurred. The findings highlighted that contemplating femicide was too threatening, and consequently participants drew on discourses of femininity, romantic love, and others to justify their remaining in their violence-ridden relationships. It emphasizes the need for additional engagement in women's understandings of intimate femicide, as women who live in abusive relationships have largely been consigned to the periphery.

URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs160196


Keywords


abuse; domestic; South Africa; interviews; discourse analysis; feminism; psychology; femicide

Full Text:

HTML PDF


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17169/fqs-17.1.2394

Copyright (c) 2016 Bianca Dekel

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.