Indigenising Photovoice: Putting Māori Cultural Values Into a Research Method

  • Glenis Mark Whakauae Research for Māori Health and Development
  • Amohia Boulton Whakauae Research for Māori Health and Development
Keywords: photovoice, Māori research methodologies, Māori-voice

Abstract

In this article, we discuss Indigenous epistemology that ensures research is inclusive of Māori cultural values, such as collectivity and storytelling. We explain an adapted photovoice methodology used in research investigating Māori (the Indigenous peoples of Aotearoa/New Zealand) patient's perspectives on rongoā Māori (traditional Māori healing) and primary health care. Traditional photovoice theoretical frameworks and methodology were modified to allow Māori participants to document and communicate their experiences of health and the health services they utilised. Moreover, we describe the necessity for cultural adaptation of the theoretical framework and methodology of photovoice to highlight culturally appropriate research practice for Māori.

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Author Biographies

Glenis Mark, Whakauae Research for Māori Health and Development

Dr. Glenis MARK, is an independent researcher currently involved in a range of research projects particularly focused on rongoā Māori (traditional Māori healing) research. Her main research interests are cultural and holistic perspectives of health and healing treatment, spirituality, Māori health research and research that advocates for the sovereignty of rongoā Māori.

Amohia Boulton, Whakauae Research for Māori Health and Development

Dr. Amohia BOULTON is the Director of Whakauae Research Services Ltd. Her research interests and publications focus on aspects of Māori health services research, particularly the relationship between, and contribution of, government policy, contracting mechanisms, and accountability frameworks to improving health outcomes for Māori. Recent publications include Māori approaches to well-being and the implications for social work; the relationship between care ethics and Māori values; and the relationship between colonisation, care and justice.

Published
2017-09-28
How to Cite
Mark, G., & Boulton, A. (2017). Indigenising Photovoice: Putting Māori Cultural Values Into a Research Method. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 18(3). https://doi.org/10.17169/fqs-18.3.2827
Section
Single Contributions