Work and Family: An Exercise in Mixed Methodology

  • Edith Pacheco Colegio de Mexico
  • Mercedes Blanco Colegio de Mexico
Keywords: mixed methodology, life trajectories, typology, middle-class women, Mexico

Abstract

In order to present an exercise showing the importance of mixed methodology, this paper offers an exploratory approach to the simultaneous use of data sources clearly identified with qualitative and quantitative research styles. In doing so we took as a starting point a different platform than the one traditionally used in the field of labor studies, at least in Mexico. Instead of having as a main frame of reference a statistical database, we first analyzed qualitative information on a group of Mexican urban, middle-class women. One of the means we have found of linking the two sources has been to construct a typology—with quantitative data and similar to one previously elaborated in a qualitative study—to describe the possible links between four life trajectories (school, work, marriage and child-bearing). Combining a quantitative analysis with the results of a previous qualitative study was precisely what made it possible to both enrich and reinforce the proposal of the existence of diversity within homogeneity. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801281

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Author Biographies

Edith Pacheco, Colegio de Mexico
Edith PACHECO is Professor of El Colegio de Mexico since 1995. Her research interests are in labor market inequalities and mixed methodology research. She has published several articles and the book: Ciudad de México heterogénea y desigual, un estudio sobre la desigualdad de las remuneraciones laborales (2004), El Colegio de México.
Mercedes Blanco, Colegio de Mexico
Mercedes BLANCO is professor and researcher at CIESAS-MEXICO since 1993. Her research interests are in gender studies, life course perspective, the study of generations, and mixed methodology. She has published several articles and the book: Empleo público en la Administración Central Mexicana. Evolución y tendencias: 1920-1988 (1995). CIESAS.
Published
2008-01-31