Asynchronous Online Photovoice: Practical Steps and Challenges to Amplify Voice for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice

  • Anna CohenMiller Nazarbayev University
Keywords: asynchronous online photovoice, equity inclusion, social justice, rigid flexibility, participant voice, motherscholar, mothers in academia, COVID-19

Abstract

While researchers initially developed photovoice methodology as a means to hear voices of vulnerable populations and of marginalized experiences, using it in an online format has recently been adapted for application during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article, I discuss implementing online photovoice in an asynchronous mode. I explore the potential of the methodology for equity, inclusion and social justice through an international study conducted with motherscholars (mothers in academia) who suddenly began guiding their children through online learning during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. I describe the steps in the online photovoice study that was intended to amplify participant voice and the challenges faced. As such, I propose novel insights, practical tips, obstacles to avoid, and critical self-reflective questions for researchers interested in expanding their toolkit for qualitative social justice research.

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Author Biography

Anna CohenMiller, Nazarbayev University

Dr. Anna COHENMILLER is faculty in the Graduate School of Education and co-founding director of The Consortium of Gender Scholars at Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan, Central Asia. She integrates the professional and personal with a commitment to building coalitions locally and internationally to promote socially-just qualitative research to facilitate and amplify voice for those marginalized, oppressed, and/or colonized.

Published
2022-05-30
How to Cite
CohenMiller, A. (2022). Asynchronous Online Photovoice: Practical Steps and Challenges to Amplify Voice for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 23(2). https://doi.org/10.17169/fqs-22.2.3860
Section
Single Contributions