Review: Janice M. Morse, Janice M. Swanson & Anton J. Kuzel (Eds.) (2001). The Nature of Qualitative Evidence

  • Donna W. Bailey University of North Carolina
Keywords: qualitative research, evidence-based medicine, quantitative research, research utilization, outcomes, research methods

Abstract

MORSE, SWANSON, and KUZEL's book provides a useful framework for exploring qualitative research from the vantage point of evidence. By providing perspectives on evidence and dimensions of qualitative and quantitative research, the chapter authors use well known tensions between qualitative and quantitative research to argue for an approach to evidence-based medicine that integrates both approaches as well as experience as useful sources of evidence. The text is divided into five parts that address the nature of evidence, the nature of questions, the nature of standards, the nature of analysis and interpretation, and the nature of utilization. The value of this book comes from the timely discussion of what counts as evidence in terms of evidence-based medicine. By arguing that qualitative research provides important contributions to clinical practice, the authors broaden the dialogue about the evidence in evidence-based medicine. The book has utility in the areas of practice, education and research. Clinicians can use the discussions as a springboard to understanding the role of qualitative research in practice. As a teaching and learning tool, the book provides the traditional issues and challenges with qualitative research in an easily accessible way. For research, the book facilitates discussions about research approaches and what counts as evidence. For the novice researcher, it is an easily read perspective. For the experienced reader, it provides a challenge to think about what really counts as evidence in practice. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0204194

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Author Biography

Donna W. Bailey, University of North Carolina
Donna W. BAILEY, RN, PhD, is the Director of Teaching Assistant Development at the Center for Teaching and Learning and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Her research interests include the influence of computerized patient record on the work of the nurse, the role of visualization in teaching and learning, and the development of faculty and students in distributed education. Recent work include: "Nurse work and the computerized patient record" (Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of North Carolina), and two contributions in Sheila P. ENGLEBARDT, & Ramona NELSON (Eds.) (2002), Health Care Informatics: An interdisciplinary approach. St Louis: Mosby—together with W. Holt ANDERSON: Protection of health care information; together with Kay S. LYTLE: Accreditation and governmental regulation.
Published
2002-11-30
Section
Methodology and Methods