The Ethics of Cogenerative Dialogue: A Cogenerative Dialogue

  • Ian Stith University of Victoria
  • Kathryn Scantlebury University of Delaware
  • Sarah-Kate LaVan Temple University
  • Christopher Emdin City University of New York
  • Ed Lehner City University of New York
  • Mijung Kim University of Victoria
Keywords: gender, ethics, solidarity, mindfulness, care, emotion, equity

Abstract

In this cogenerative dialogue about cogenerative dialogue as qualitative research method and ethics, we move beyond our individual contributions in this special issue to begin a process that we hope will be carried further by our readers. We conclude that cogenerative dialoguing constitutes an excellent starting point towards enacting equity in practice. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0602449

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Author Biographies

Ian Stith, University of Victoria
Ian STITH is doctoral fellow in the Pacific Center for Scientific and Technological Literacy at the University of Victoria.
Kathryn Scantlebury, University of Delaware
Kathryn SCANTLEBURY is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Delaware. Her research interests focus on gender issues in science education.
Sarah-Kate LaVan, Temple University
Sarah-Kate LaVAN is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Technology in Education at the Temple University. Her research interests focus on cogenerative dialogues in school and college classrooms.
Christopher Emdin, City University of New York
Christopher EMDIN is a full time doctoral student in Urban Education at The Graduate Center of City University of New York. He currently teaches Physics and Chemistry in the New York City Public Schools. His research interests include Science and Mathematics education and the emergence of student culture within those fields.
Ed Lehner, City University of New York
Ed LEHNER is a New York City Teacher and a full-time student in Urban Education at the Graduate Center of City University of New York. He currently teaches in Brooklyn where his research considers how cogenerative dialogues can be used to improve academic achievement across the high school curriculum.
Mijung Kim, University of Victoria
Mijung KIM is postdoctoral fellow at the University of Victoria. Her research focuses on the embodied nature of cognition.
Published
2006-03-31
How to Cite
Stith, I., Scantlebury, K., LaVan, S.-K., Emdin, C., Lehner, E., & Kim, M. (2006). The Ethics of Cogenerative Dialogue: A Cogenerative Dialogue. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 7(2). https://doi.org/10.17169/fqs-7.2.128
Section
FQS Debate: Qualitative Research and Ethics

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